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Knowing how to blitzscale is one thing…knowing WHEN you need to blitzscale is another. As I outlined in the intro paragraph- the sole use case for pulling the blitzscale lever (and it’s a big one….arguably the biggest) is when you need to be the first mover at scale.

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Let’s back up and take a look at that statement – because it just sounds like another start-upism, another Silicon Valley running gag. It really isn’t, I promise. The term first mover is a term that denotes that your firm is the first market entrant. Tack onto that the term “at scale” and that speaks of a different offering altogether. Often times, in the startup world it doesn’t matter who is first, it matters who grabs the most market share.

 

That’s why it is vitally important to shoot for being first, but honestly perfect and hone being the first at scale. There is no bragging rights or special honor in being the first to invent, it really comes down to who does the market respond to and adopt. User adoption is your key to success, and blitzscaling is your key to reaching that pivotal moment where you’re the biggest AND fastest moving fish in a blue ocean.

 

So with that being said, here is your checklist to validate that you really should be putting together a 3 prong approach blitzscale plan. As you’ll learn in the next post, there are three ways to scale and in order to blitzscale…you should be growing in all 3 ways. Of course, not at the same time, as certain levers can be pulled before others and trying to split your efforts tri-directionally results in a slower time over time growth. (It’s simple math really.)

 

  1. Does your company have the first mover advantage, or is it in a small group of competing first movers?

  2. Do you have analysis on hand of the relative market opportunity?

  3. Do you have analysis on hand of the relative market opportunity slices that your competitors are positioned to grab?

  4. Do you have high level details on their customer acquisition strategy?

  5. Can you make reasonable projections regarding the velocity of customer acquisition you’ll need to support to hit scale?

  6. From what point in the customer acquisition race will your competitors be unable to compete with you? As in, at which point do your customer acquisition costs go down, at what point do you start hitting economies of scale?

  7. Do you have a foundational figure in your organization that can drive massive action in the operations sphere?

  8. Do you have a foundational figure in your organization that can drive massive action in the Human Resourcing sphere? Talent acquisition and retention is key for the pace at which you need to grow.

Author Mischaela Elkins

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